Bankruptcy Frequently Asked Questions

What is bankruptcy?

Bankruptcy is a legal proceeding in which a person who can not pay his or her bills can get a fresh financial start. The right to file for bankruptcy is provided by federal law, and all bankruptcy cases are handled in federal court. Filing bankruptcy immediately stops all of your creditors from seeking to collect debts from you and stops them from taking your property, at least until your debts are sorted out according to the law.

What can bankruptcy do for me?

Bankruptcy may make it possible for you to:

  • Eliminate the legal obligation to pay most or all of your debts. This is called a "discharge" of debts. It is designed to give you a fresh financial start.
  • Stop foreclosure on your house or mobile home and allow you an opportunity to catch up on missed payments. (Bankruptcy does not, however, automatically eliminate mortgages and other liens on your property without payment.)
  • Prevent repossession of a car or other property, or force the creditor to return property even after it has been repossessed.
  • Stop wage garnishment, debt collection harassment, phone calls and similar creditor actions to collect a debt.
  • Restore or prevent termination of utility service.

What bankruptcy can not do?

Bankruptcy can not, however, cure every financial problem. Nor is it the right step for every individual. In bankruptcy, it is usually not possible to:

  • Eliminate certain rights of "secured" creditors. A creditor is "secured" if it has taken a mortgage or other lien on property as collateral for a loan. Common examples are car loans and home mortgages. You can force secured creditors to take payments over time in the bankruptcy process and bankruptcy can eliminate your obligation to pay any additional money on the debt if you decide to give back the property. But you generally can not keep secured property unless you continue to pay the debt.
  • Discharge types of debts singled out by the bankruptcy law for special treatment, such as child support, alimony, most student loans, court restitution orders, criminal fines, and most taxes.
  • Discharge debts that arise after bankruptcy has been filed.

Which is better Chapter 7 or Chapter 13?

One type of bankruptcy isn't better than the other. During the free initial consultation, we will discuss your situation and determine which type of bankruptcy will work best for you. Everyone's situation is different. The specific facts of your case will determine whether to file Chapter 7 or Chapter 13.

Chapter 7 (Straight Bankruptcy)

In a bankruptcy case under chapter 7, you file a petition asking the court to discharge your debts. The basic idea in a chapter 7 bankruptcy is to wipe out (discharge) your debts in exchange for your giving up property, except for "exempt" property which the law allows you to keep. In most cases, all of your property will be exempt. But property which is not exempt is sold, with the money distributed to creditors. If you want to keep property like a home or a car and are behind on the mortgage or car loan payments, a chapter 7 case probably will not be the right choice for you. That is because chapter 7 bankruptcy does not eliminate the right of mortgage holders or car loan creditors to take your property to cover your debt. If your income is above the median family income for a family of your size, you may have to file a chapter 13 case. Higher-income consumers must fill out "means test" forms requiring detailed information about their income and expenses. If the forms show, based on standards in the law, that they have a certain amount left over that could be paid to unsecured creditors, the bankruptcy court may decide that they can not file a chapter 7 case, unless there are special extenuating circumstances.

Chapter 13 (Reorganization)

In a chapter 13 case you file a "plan" showing how you will pay off some of your past-due and current debts over three to five years. The most important thing about a chapter 13 case is that it will allow you to keep valuable property - especially your home and car - which might otherwise be lost, if you can make the payments which the bankruptcy law requires to be made to your creditors. In most cases, these payments will be at least as much as your regular monthly payments on your mortgage or car loan, with some extra payment to get caught up on the amount you have fallen behind. You should consider filing a chapter 13 plan if you:

  • Own your home and are in danger of losing it through foreclosure;
  • Are behind on debt payments, but can catch up if given some time;
  • Have valuable property which is not exempt, but you can afford to pay creditors from your income over time. You will need to have enough income during your chapter 13 case to pay for your necessities and to keep up with the required payments as they come due.
  • Are behind on car payments and your car is about to be repossessed.

What does it cost to file for bankruptcy?

The filing fees charged by the court are $310 to file for bankruptcy under chapter 13 and $335 to file for bankruptcy under chapter 7, whether for one person or a married couple.

If you hire an attorney, you will also have to pay the attorney's fees The specific fees will vary depending on your case. Those fees will be discussed with you at the free initial consultation and may be paid in installments.

What property can I keep?

In a chapter 7 case, you can keep all property which the law says is "exempt" from the claims of creditors. Exemptions are determined by state law.

In determining whether property is exempt, you must keep a few things in mind. The value of property is not the amount you paid for it, but what it is worth when your bankruptcy case is filed. Especially for furniture and cars, this may be a lot less than what you paid or what it would cost to buy a replacement. You also only need to look at your equity in property. That means you count your exemptions against the full value minus any money that you owe on mortgages or liens. For example, if you own a $50,000 house with a $40,000 mortgage, you have only $10,000 in equity. You can fully protect the $50,000 home with a $10,000 exemption. While your exemptions allow you to keep property even in a chapter 7 case, your exemptions do not make any difference to the right of a mortgage holder or car loan creditor to take the property to cover the debt if you are behind. In a chapter 13 case, you can keep all of your property if your plan meets the requirements of the bankruptcy law. In most cases you will have to pay the mortgages or liens as you would if you didn't file bankruptcy.

What will happen to my home and car if I file bankruptcy?

In most cases you will not lose your home or car during your bankruptcy case as long as your equity in the property is fully exempt. Even if your property is not fully exempt, you will be able to keep it, if you pay its non-exempt value to creditors in chapter 13. However, some of your creditors may have a "security interest" in your home, automobile, or other personal property. This means that you gave that creditor a mortgage on the home or put your other property up as collateral for the debt. Bankruptcy does not make these security interests go away. If you don't make your payments on that debt, the creditor may be able to take and sell the home or the property, during or after the bankruptcy case. In a chapter 13 case, you may be able to keep certain secured property by paying the creditor the value of the property rather than the full amount owed on the debt. Or you can use chapter 13 to catch up on back payments and get current on the loan. There are also several ways that you can keep collateral or mortgaged property after you file a chapter 7 bankruptcy. You can agree to keep making your payments on the debt until it is paid in full. Or you can pay the creditor the amount that the property you want to keep is worth. In some cases involving fraud or other improper conduct by the creditor, you may be able to challenge the debt. If you put up your household goods as collateral for a loan (other than a loan to purchase the goods), you can usually keep your property without making any more payments on that debt.

Can I own anything after bankruptcy?

Yes! Many people believe they can not own anything for a period of time after filing for bankruptcy. This is not true. You can keep your exempt property and anything you obtain after the bankruptcy is filed. However, if you receive an inheritance, a property settlement, or life insurance benefits within 180 days after filing for bankruptcy, that money or property may have to be paid to your creditors if the property or money is not exempt.

Will bankruptcy wipe out all my debts?

Yes, with some exceptions. Bankruptcy will not normally wipe out:

  • Money owed for child support or alimony;
  • Most fines and penalties owed to government agencies;
  • Most taxes and debts incurred to pay taxes which can not be discharged;
  • Student loans;
  • Debts not listed on your bankruptcy petition;
  • Loans you got by knowingly giving false information to a creditor, who reasonably relied on it in making you the loan;
  • Debts resulting from "willful and malicious" harm;
  • Debts incurred by driving while intoxicated;
  • Mortgages and other liens which are not paid in the bankruptcy case (but bankruptcy will wipe out your obligation to pay any additional money if the property is sold by the creditor).

Will I have to go to court?

In most bankruptcy cases, you only have to go to a proceeding called the "meeting of creditors" to meet with the bankruptcy trustee and any creditor who chooses to come. Most of the time, this meeting will be a short and simple procedure where you are asked a few questions about your bankruptcy forms and your financial situation. Occasionally, if complications arise, or if you choose to dispute a debt, you may have to appear at a hearing.

What else must I do to complete my case?

After your case is filed, you must complete an approved course in personal finances. This course will take approximately two hours to complete. Many of the course providers give you a choice to take the course in-person at a designated location, over the Internet (usually by watching a video), or over the telephone. Your attorney can give you a list of organizations that provide approved courses, or you can check the website for the United States Trustee Program office at www.usdoj.gov/ust.

Will bankruptcy affect my credit?

Your credit score is extremely important and that is why we sign up all of our clients for the 720 Credit Score Program at no additional charge. For most individuals your score is better after you file because you are no longer delinquent on accounts. This programs helps you accelerate the process of improving your score. Bankruptcy will probably not make things any worse.

The fact that you've filed a bankruptcy can appear on your credit record for ten years from the date your case was filed. But because bankruptcy wipes out your old debts, you are likely to be in a better position to pay your current bills, and you may be able to get new credit. If you decide to file bankruptcy, remember that debts discharged in your bankruptcy should be listed on your credit report as having a zero balance, meaning you do not own anything on the debt. Debts incorrectly reported as having a balance owed will negatively affect your credit score and make it more difficult or costly to get credit. You should check your credit report after your bankruptcy discharge and file a dispute with credit reporting agencies if this information is not correct.

What else should I know?

Utility services - Public utilities, such as the electric company, can not refuse or cut off service because you have filed for bankruptcy. However, the utility can require a deposit for future service and you do have to pay bills which arise after bankruptcy is filed.

Discrimination - An employer or government agency can not discriminate against you because you have filed for bankruptcy. Government agencies and private entities involved in student loan programs also can not discriminate against you based on a bankruptcy filing.

Driver's license - If you lost your license solely because you couldn't pay court-ordered damages caused in an accident, bankruptcy will allow you to get your license back.

Co-signers - If someone has co-signed a loan with you and you file for bankruptcy, the co-signer may have to pay your debt. If you file under chapter 13, you may be able to protect co-signers, depending upon the terms of your chapter 13 plan.

Can I file bankruptcy without an attorney?

Although it may be possible for some people to file a bankruptcy case without an attorney, it is not a step to be taken lightly. The process is difficult and you may lose property or other rights if you do not know the law.

Do I have to list all of my assets and debts?

YES!! If you don't answer all of the questions on the bankruptcy petition honestly, you can be prosecuted in Federal Court and be denied a discharge. You sign the forms under penalty of perjury and it is very important to disclose all of your assets, debts and income.

Will bankruptcy stop a foreclosure?

Yes, but the bankruptcy must be filed prior to the property being sold. Upon filing the bankruptcy, we immediately notify the mortgage company and the foreclosure attorneys to advise them to stop the foreclosure. You can save your home even though you are far behind in payments through the filing of chapter 13. As soon as foreclosure is filed, you will be contacted by firms claiming they can help you save your home. Using one of these firms almost never works. Chapter 13 forces the mortgage company to stop foreclosure and allows you to catch up on your terms.

Will bankruptcy stop a garnishment?

Yes. When we file your bankruptcy, we notify the creditor that a bankruptcy has been filed and the garnishment must be terminated.

Can bankruptcy help me with child support arrearages?

Yes. Past due child support payments can be paid through a chapter 13 bankruptcy. Current payments which come due after the filing of the chapter 13 must be paid directly by you. Failure to pay your support after you file will result in the dismissal of your bankruptcy.

What if my vehicle has already been repossessed?

You generally can get your car back after filing chapter 13. However, once the car has been sold, it is too late. It is important to file quickly to save the car.

What is a "Secured" credit card?

Another type of credit marketed to recent bankruptcy filers as a good way to reestablish credit involves "secured" credit cards. These are cards where the balances are secured by a bank deposit. The card allows you a credit limit up to the amount you have on deposit in a particular bank account. If you can't make the payments, you lose the money in the account. They may be useful to establish that you can make regular monthly payments on a credit card after you have had trouble in the past. But since almost everyone now gets unsecured credit card offers even after previous financial problems, there is less reason to consider allowing a creditor to use your bank deposits as collateral. It is preferable not to tie up your bank account.

What are credit repair companies?

Beware of companies that claim: "We can erase bad credit." These companies rarely offer valuable services for what they charge, and are often an outright scam. The truth is that no one can erase bad credit information from your report if it is accurate. And if there is old or inaccurate information on your credit report, you can correct it yourself for free.

Can I discharge Payday loans?

Some "check cashers" and finance companies offer to take a personal check from you and hold it without cashing it for one or two weeks. In return, they will give you an amount of cash that is less than the amount of your check. The difference between the amount of your check and the cash you get back in return is interest that the lender is charging you. These payday loans are very costly. For example, if you write a $256 check and the lender gives you $200 back as a loan for two weeks, the $56 you pay equals a 728-percent interest rate! And if you don't have the money to cover the check, the lender will either sue you or try to get you to write another check in a larger amount. If you choose to write another check, the lender gets more money from you and you get further into debt. You can normally discharge Payday loan without paying them in bankruptcy.

Do I still owe secured debts (mortgages, car loans) after bankruptcy?

Yes and No. The term "secured debt" applies when you give the lender a mortgage, deed of trust, or lien on property as collateral for a loan. The most common types of secured debts are home mortgages and car loans. The treatment of secured debts after bankruptcy can be confusing. Bankruptcy cancels your personal legal obligation to pay

a debt, even a secured debt. This means the secured creditor can't sue you after a bankruptcy to collect the money you owe. But, the creditor can still take back their collateral if you don't pay the debt. For example, if you are behind on a car loan or home mortgage, the creditor can ask the bankruptcy court for permission to repossess your car or foreclose on your home. Or the creditor can just wait until your bankruptcy is over and then do so. Although a secured creditor can't sue you if you don't pay, that creditor can usually take back the collateral. For this reason, if you want to keep property that is collateral for a secured debt, you will need to catch up on the payments and continue to make them during and after bankruptcy, keep any required insurance, and you may have to reaffirm the loan.

What is reaffirmation?

Although you filed chapter 7 bankruptcy to cancel your debts, you have the option to sign a written agreement to "reaffirm" a debt. If you choose to reaffirm, you agree to be legally obligated to pay the debt despite bankruptcy. If you reaffirm, the debt is not canceled by bankruptcy. If you fall behind on a reaffirmed debt, you can get collection calls, be sued, and possibly have your pay attached or other property taken. Reaffirming a debt is a serious matter. You should never agree to a reaffirmation without a very good reason.

Do I have to reaffirm any debts?

No. Reaffirmation is always optional. It is not required by bankruptcy law or any other law. If a creditor tries to pressure you to reaffirm, remember you can always say no.

Can I change my mind after I reaffirm a debt?

Yes. You can cancel any reaffirmation agreement for sixty days after it is filed with the court. You can also cancel at any time before your discharge order. To cancel a reaffirmation agreement, you must notify the creditor in writing. You do not have to give a reason. Once you have canceled, the creditor must return any payments you made on the agreement. Also, remember that a reaffirmation agreement has to be in writing, has to be signed by your lawyer or approved by the judge, and has to be made before your bankruptcy is over. Any other reaffirmation agreement is not valid.

Should I reaffirm?

If you are thinking about reaffirming, the first question should always be whether you can afford the monthly payments. Reaffirming any debt means that you are agreeing

to make the payments every month, and to face the consequences if you don't. The reaffirmation agreement must include information about your income and expenses and your signed statement that you can afford the payments. If you have any doubts whether you can afford the payments, do not reaffirm. Caution is always a good idea when you are giving up your right to have a debt canceled. Before reaffirming, always consider your other options. For example, instead of reaffirming a car loan you can't afford, can you get by with a less costly used car for a while?